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Academics get to test flow chemistry system for free

Syrris announce FRX competition winners

Leading chemistry automation product innovator, Syrris, has announced the winners of its competition to win the use of its new FRX300 flow chemistry system. Academics from around the world were asked to submit an abstract detailing the research they would carry out if they won the use of a Syrris FRX300.

From the many entrants, the three most novel proposals came from the University of Twente, The Netherlands, the University of Southampton, UK, and the University of Oregon, USA. Each winner not only has one month’s free use of the FRX300, but also delivery, training and system support for this time.

The winning papers were; “Multiphase Gas-Liquid Reaction Processes” by the Membrane Technology Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, “Synthetic Studies with Flow Chemistry (including macrocyclizations, heterocycle synthesis, multicomponent condensations)” by Dr A Ganesan, the University of Southampton, and “Microreactor Control of Crystal Form and Phase” by Prof. Kenneth M. Doxsee, Department of Chemistry, University of Oregon. Amongst the many other entrants, there were applications covering such broad areas as nanosynthesis, LDA enolate chemistry, azide chemistry, PAT (Process Analytical Technology), formulations, azo dye chemistry and kinetic resolutions.

Designed for both solid- and solution-phase chemistry, the modular design of the FRX means that it is easy-to-use and allows the chemist to select the set-up that best suits their individual needs.

The winning chemists will have the opportunity to explore the functionality of the FRX300 system, and apply this to their particular chemistry.

The FRX300 prize includes 3 pump modules, a reagents store, a reactor adaptor, a tube- and micro-reactor, a pressurisation module, a Flow Liquid-Liquid Extraction (FLLEX) for compound purification and separation post reaction, and a collection module.